Archive | Pronunciation

Vowel Perception Test: e vs. ae

Save all forms to your computer before beginning the test! Your computer will not save the information if opened directly from the website.

Here are the files for the front mid and low vowel perception test. These are the vowels you hear in words such as ‘bet’ and ‘bat.’ Be sure to listen to the test in a quiet area where you are not going to be distracted.

Instructions:

  1. Complete (a) the consent form and (b) the language contact questionnaire.
  2. Save (c) the Speech Perception Test answer sheet to your computer before you begin the test. Your information will not save properly if you open it directly from the website.
  3. Click on each part of the test to hear the audio (in “Speech Perception test” below).
  4. Listen to each part of the test and complete the answer sheet as you go along.
  5. Save your answers.
  6. Email your completed answer sheet and post test questionnaire (attached to the answer sheet) to johnathan.jones@gmail.com.
  7. That’s all!

 

Speech Perception test

Minimal Pairs: /l/ vs /r/

Rice or lice? These minimal pairs help practice the difference, targeting the sounds while having fun with pronunciation. Print the activity sheet below for greatly interactive lessons.

If you don’t have a pdf reader, go here for the latest version from Adobe.

minimal pairs l vs r thumbnailWhat to do

  1. Download and print the handout.
  2. Illustrate the difference between the two sounds. Emphasize tongue and lip position in addition to voicing (or lack of).
  3. Read aloud while students circle the correct picture. (Target: Listening)
  4. Use the minimal pairs in “Sentences” to illustrate the importance of the sounds in context. Ask students to circle the correct word. (Target: Listening)
  5. Have students work in pairs with “More Practice.” In pairs, one student reads while the other chooses the word that was elucidated. (Target: Speaking/ Listening)
  6. Confirm understanding of your lesson by asking students to read sample minimal pairs while you or the class selects the word that was heard. (Target: Speaking/ Listening)

If you haven’t used them before, minimal pairs are an excellent way to tackle challenging sounds in an entertaining way. They truly inject life into a classroom when used at the right time.

You may also be interested in these word pairs:     /s/ vs /sh/     /f/ vs /v/     /i/ vs /I/     /z/ vs /dʒ/

Minimal Pairs: /s/ vs /ʃ/

Sip or ship? These minimal pairs help practice the difference, targeting the sounds while having fun with pronunciation. Print the activity sheet below for greatly interactive lessons.

If you don’t have a pdf reader, go here for the latest version from Adobe.

minimal pairs s vs sh thumbnailWhat to do

  1. Download and print the handout.
  2. Illustrate the difference between the two sounds. Emphasize tongue and lip position in addition to voicing (or lack of).
  3. Read aloud while students circle the correct picture. (Target: Listening)
  4. Use the minimal pairs in “Sentences” to illustrate the importance of the sounds in context. Ask students to circle the correct word. (Target: Listening)
  5. Have students work in pairs with “More Practice.” In pairs, one student reads while the other chooses the word that was elucidated. (Target: Speaking/ Listening)
  6. Confirm understanding of your lesson by asking students to read sample minimal pairs while you or the class selects the word that was heard. (Target: Speaking/ Listening)

If you haven’t used them before, minimal pairs are an excellent way to tackle challenging sounds in an entertaining way. They truly inject life into a classroom when used at the right time.

You may also be interested in these word pairs:     /l/ vs /r/     /f/ vs /v/     /i/ vs /I/     /z/ vs /dʒ/

Minimal Pairs: /z/ vs /dʒ/

Raise or rage? These minimal pairs help practice the difference, targeting the sounds while having fun with pronunciation. Print the activity sheet below for greatly interactive lessons.

If you don’t have a pdf reader, go here for the latest version from Adobe.

minimal pairs z vs dʒ thumbnailWhat to do

  1. Download and print the handout.
  2. Illustrate the difference between the two sounds. Emphasize tongue and lip position in addition to voicing (or lack of).
  3. Read aloud while students circle the correct picture. (Target: Listening)
  4. Use the minimal pairs in “Sentences” to illustrate the importance of the sounds in context. Ask students to circle the correct word. (Target: Listening)
  5. Have students work in pairs with “More Practice.” In pairs, one student reads while the other chooses the word that was elucidated. (Target: Speaking/ Listening)
  6. Confirm understanding of your lesson by asking students to read sample minimal pairs while you or the class selects the word that was heard. (Target: Speaking/ Listening)

If you haven’t used them before, minimal pairs are an excellent way to tackle challenging sounds in an entertaining way. They truly inject life into a classroom when used at the right time.

You may also be interested in these word pairs:     /l/ vs /r/     /s/ vs /sh/     /f/ vs /v/     /i/ vs /I/